Book #3-A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

I was not looking forward to another James Joyce novel, however, I was able to enjoy parts of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Most notable of my reading enjoyment was the vivid descriptions of hell that surely those raised  Catholic could  relate to as could readers of Dante’s Inferno.  It nearly sent me to the confessional!

Perhaps I’m falling into a literary mindset, but there were several lines in this book worth quoting, so here goes…

“This race and this country and this life produced me, he said.  I shall express myself as I am.”

“…and leaving him to whisper of innocent transgressions in the latticed ear of a priest.”  

“Whatever else is unsure in this stinking dunghill of a world a mother’s love is not.”

Since I like to imagine meeting the authors, I’m afraid I still don’t think I’d be fond of Mr. Joyce, even in his younger years.  His insinuations that his fellow students were beneath him intellectually left a bad taste.  While I applaud his courage for change, a part of me sees it also as a possible cop out, but perhaps I took affront at his maternal indifference.

On my scale,  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man rates a 7 out of 10.

Check out the Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels.

Next up, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita

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2 Comments

Filed under A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

2 responses to “Book #3-A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

  1. So was there an actual story to follow along in this book? I am still traumatized from Finnegans Wake.

    • vsudia

      I’m afraid you’ll be traumatized again. This seemed to be more of Joyce’s ramblings, but there were parts of it that were tolerable and it was much more straightforward than Ulysses. Good luck!

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